Tincture (Page 2)

This page is a continuation the discussion of Tincture in heraldry began on the page Tinctures (Page 1).

Furs

Furs in heraldry are meant to reflect the use of exotic furs in the costumes of royalty and nobility. They count as neither metals nor colors for the sake of the rule of tincture, so rules about what tinctures they may be used with do not apply; however, care should be taken when designing arms to ensure that contrast between the field and and charge is retained for the sake of “readability” of the design.

Ermine

Hermine Hermelin Armiño Hermelijn

smp-ermine

More information on what makes up the Ermine Point, please see our article on Ermine.

Ermines

contre-hermine Gegenhermelin

smp-ermines

A simple counter-colored treatment of Ermine the fur Ermines can cause confusion for heraldic novices who miss the “s” at the end of the word.

Pean

herminé de Or

smp-pean

Pean replaces the white ermine tails with gold, used to signify great wealth.

 

Vair

Vair Feh (Eisenhut) Vair

smp-vair

It is said that the vair fur was originally derived from alternating backs and bellies of European squirrel furs, which gave the effect of alternating light and dark shades.
 

Vair (Ancient)

smp-vair-counter-vair

The alternating pattern for ancient vair exhibits a different type of symmetry than the typical vair fur, but is otherwise identical.

Vair-Counter-Vair

smp-vair-en-point
Again a different form of symmetry is shown in Vair-Counter-Vair.

Vair-en-Pointe

 

 

 

 

smp-potenteePotent

 

 

 

smp-potentPotent (Occasional Form)

smp-potent-counter-potentCounter-potent

Kürsch

Fur au naturel, vair bellies

This depictions of a “natural” fur drawn “brown and hairy” can be met with in German heraldry as Kürsch and rarely in French arms as Fur au naturel, it is said to also appear in British arms as vair bellies, although, I have never seen an example.

Kürsch-Hemelin

Patterns

Checky

Fusily

Gutté

Lozengy

Nebuly

Plumeté Or and Sable

Semee-de-lis

Counterchanged

Expresses that the field is of two tinctures, metal and color and that the charge upon it takes both, the alternate of the tincture which it lies upon.

Roundles

In addition to the aforementioned tinctures, there are nine roundles, roundlets, or balls used in heraldry. One need only use their names which are sufficient to indicate their color.

 bezant BEZANT, Or.  plate PLATE, Argent.
hurt

HURTS,  Azure.
torteaux

TORTEAUX, Gules.

 

golpe

GOLPE, Purpure.
pellet

PELLET, Sable.
orange

ORANGE, Tenne.
guzes

GUZES, Sanguine.
pomeis

POMEIS, Vert.
   

 

Works Referenced:

Wade, W. Cecil. The Symbolisms of Heraldry or a Treatise on the Meanings and Derivations of Armorial Bearings.  London: George Redway, 1898.